AVMA Convention 2013

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Are you going to AVMA’s 2013 Convention in Chicago?  Be sure to attend some of Dr. Justine Lee’s lectures!

Monday, July 22

12:24pm – 12:36pm
What Emetics to Use in Dogs and Cats (14275)
This brief practical tip will review the appropriate emetic agents to use.

12:36pm – 12:48pm
Activated Charcoal: Why You Love to Hate It (14276)
This lecture will review the indications, contraindications, and potential complications of activated charcoal in the veterinary poisoned patient.

1:00pm – 1:50pm (presenting with Dr. Robert Poppenga)
Inside the Issues Better Case Management Panel: When Emergency and Critical Care Medicine Meets Toxicology, Case Management Strategies Part 1 (13136)
Poisoned patients routinely present to emergency clinics for treatment.  Some poisons affect multiple organ systems, making case management challenging.  In other cases, patients might have been exposed to multiple poisons that can complicate treatment.  For the majority of cases, there is no specific antidote available which means that a positive case outcome relies on 1) early decontamination 2) symptomatic and supportive care, and 3) appropriate monitoring.  Unfortunately, patients frequently present well after exposure to a poison which greatly decreases the efficacy of decontamination.  Thus, symptomatic and supportive care and close monitoring are critical to success.  This series of case-based lectures will focus on the management of symptomatic patients poisoned by toxicants or toxins that can affect multiple organ systems or who have been exposed to multiple toxicants or toxins.  Discussions will utilize real-life cases gleaned from animal poison control or veterinary diagnostic laboratory records and include exposures to hepatotoxic mushrooms, blue-green algal toxins, crotalid snakes, non-anticoagulant rodenticides, and illicit, prescription and over-the counter drugs, among others.

2:00pm – 2:50pm (presenting with Dr. Robert Poppenga)
Inside the Issues Better Case Management Panel: When Emergency and Critical Care Medicine Meets Toxicology, Case Management Strategies Part 2 (14144)
Poisoned patients routinely present to emergency clinics for treatment.  Some poisons affect multiple organ systems, making case management challenging.  In other cases, patients might have been exposed to multiple poisons that can complicate treatment.  For the majority of cases, there is no specific antidote available which means that a positive case outcome relies on 1) early decontamination 2) symptomatic and supportive care, and 3) appropriate monitoring.  Unfortunately, patients frequently present well after exposure to a poison which greatly decreases the efficacy of decontamination.  Thus, symptomatic and supportive care and close monitoring are critical to success.  This series of case-based lectures will focus on the management of symptomatic patients poisoned by toxicants or toxins that can affect multiple organ systems or who have been exposed to multiple toxicants or toxins.  Discussions will utilize real-life cases gleaned from animal poison control or veterinary diagnostic laboratory records and include exposures to hepatotoxic mushrooms, blue-green algal toxins, crotalid snakes, non-anticoagulant rodenticides, and illicit, prescription and over-the counter drugs, among others.

4:00pm – 4:50pm
Identifying Your Inner Green Thumb: Poisonous Plants in Small Animals (13370)
This one hour lecture will review the top 10 most common plants poisonous to small animals and review decontamination, mechanism of action of toxicity, and review of treatment.  While some of these plants may only result in mild clinical signs, some can be fatal when ingested. Plants such as true lilies (Lilium or Hemerocallis), sago palm, azalea/Rhododendron, cardiac glycosides (e.g., kalanchoe, oleander, yew), soluble oxalates (e.g., shamrock, star fruit rhubarb), and insoluble oxalates (e.g., peace lily, Calla lily) will be reviewed.

5:00pm-5:50pm
Rodenticides: It’s Not Just Vitamin K Anymore (13369)
Just had a dog eat a blue or green block of rat poison?  Don’t give that shot of Vitamin K just yet!  With new EPA mandates, the use of long-acting anticoagulant (LAAC) rodenticides will be less prevalent in your poisoned pets.  This lecture will review the 4 most common active ingredients found in rodenticides, including long-acting anticoagulants (LAAC), cholecalciferol (Vitamin D3), bromethalin, and phosphides.  A review of decontamination, mechanism of action, and treatment will be discussed.

 

Published on July 15, 2013
Categorized under: Continuing Education,Professional Events,Veterinarian Tips