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Carprofen

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Poisonous to: Cats, Dogs

Level of toxicity: Generally moderate to severe

Common signs to watch for:

  • Vomiting
  • Bloody vomitus
  • Diarrhea
  • Black-tarry stool
  • Inappetance
  • Lethargy
  • Inappropriate urination or thirst
  • General malaise
  • Abdominal pain
  • Seizures

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Carprofen, more commonly known by its trade name Rimadyl, is a veterinary-specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is commonly used for osteoarthritis, inflammation, and pain control in dogs. Carprofen is occasionally used in cats (typically as an injection around the time of surgery); it should never be given to cats unless done so directly by a veterinarian. When ingested in toxic amounts, it can result in severe gastric ulceration and acute kidney failure in both dogs and cats. Signs of toxicity include vomiting, diarrhea, bloody vomitus, black-tarry stool, inappetance, lethargy, inappropriate urination or thirst, general malaise, abdominal pain, and seizures or death. Rarely, with chronic ingestion, it can result in liver toxicity in dogs.

If you suspect your dog or cat was poisoned by an NSAID, call your veterinarian and Pet Poison Helpline immediately for life-saving treatment advice. The sooner you treat this, the less expensive and less dangerous to your pet it is!

Poison type: Medications

Alternate names: Rimadyl, NSAID, NSAIDs