Pet Poison Helpline is staffed with the following trained veterinary health experts:

  • Board-certified veterinary toxicologists (DABVT, DABT)
    • Drs. Ahna Brutlag and Sherry Ripple (Welch) have been elected as ABVT’s President-Elect and Treasurer for the years 2020-2022.
    • Dr. Brutlag will assume the President role in August of 2022.
  • Board-certified internal medicine specialists (DACVIM)
  • Board-certified emergency critical care specialists (DACVECC)
  • Certified veterinary technicians (including American Veterinary Emergency Critical Care Technicians – AVECCT)
  • Veterinarians (DVM)
  • Clinical pharmacists/Doctors of Pharmacy(PharmD)

All of our medical professionals have received extensive education in the area of veterinary toxicology prior to managing cases. Clinical pharmacists and board-certified veterinarians in internal medicine, emergency and critical care, and toxicology are available around the clock, as are herpetologists. Due to the extraordinary volume of serious pet poisoning cases involving human pharmaceuticals, clinical pharmacists are a critical member of our professional team. This multi-disciplinary approach to case management allows us to offer the highest level of assistance to you and your pet or patient.
Pet Poison Helpline is also connected to the University of Minnesota’s College of Veterinary Medicine and College of Pharmacy. At the veterinary school, PPH maintains adjunct faculty positions where we participate in both the veterinary toxicology course as well as various population medicine courses. We have a formal affiliation with the College of Pharmacy in which our staff hold clinical faculty positions and lead courses in toxicology, herbal medicine, and more.

Pet Poison Helpline has over 30 years of experience and expertise in the management of pets exposed to potentially dangerous substances. PPH is also partnered with the world’s largest industry poison control center to ensure pharmacovigilance and safety for both humans and pets, and serves multiple veterinary and human pharmaceutical companies and household good producers. Our core group of toxicologists founded the Minnesota Regional Poison Control Center over 25 years ago as faculty of the University of Minnesota. We’ve set the national standard as pioneers in industry toxicology. We handle over 100,000 cases a year for the large number of clients we serve. During the past three decades, our team has managed over 2.5 million cases involving potential poisonings.

Pet Poison Helpline is proud to support the following organizations, through donated services, activities, fundraising efforts, or financial contributions:

  • Autism 5K (Minneapolis, MN)
  • University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine Scholarship Fund (St. Paul, MN)
  • Feline Rescue (St. Paul, MN)
  • Guiding Eyes for the Blind
  • Minnesota Hooved Animal Rescue (Zimmerman, MN)
  • Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation (Minneapolis, MN)
  • The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society
  • American Botanical Council
  • American Lung Association
  • University of Minnesota Foundation (Minneapolis, MN)
  • American Cancer Society
  • Kids Clothes Club (Brookline, MA)
  • Operation Glass Slipper (Minneapolis, MN)
  • Basic Animal Rescue Training (BART) (St. Paul, MN)
  • Pet Haven (Minneapolis, MN)
  • Ascension Place (Minneapolis, MN) – providing stable living environments for women in crisis or transition
  • St. Anne’s Place (Minneapolis, MN) – providing stable living environments for women in crisis or transition
  • University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine Hoof n Woof 5K Fun Run/Walk

Our veterinary and pharmacy staff at Pet Poison Helpline and SafetyCall International have contributed significantly towards both the veterinary and human medical literature. Several of our publications are listed below:

Publications

Trim CM, Adams JG, Hovda LR. Failure of xylazine to induce anesthesia in two horses. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1987;190(2):201-202.

Hovda LR, McGuirk SM, Lunn DP. Total parenteral nutrition in a neonatal llama. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1990;196(2):319-322.

Hovda LR, Shaftoe S, Rose ML, Clemmons LH. Mediastinal squamous cell carcinoma and thyroid carcinoma in an aged horse. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1990;197(9):1187-1189.

Hovda LR, Gordon BG, Finney D, et al. Transient hypogammaglobulinemia in a family of Arabian horses. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1992;200:289-293.

Harris C, Filandrinos DT. Accidental administration of activated charcoal into the lung: Aspiration by Proxy. Annals of Emergency Medicine 1993;22(9):1470-1473.

Geor RJ, Becker RL, Kanara EW, Hovda LR, et al. Toxicosis in horses after ingestion of hoary alyssum. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1992;201(1):63-67.

Hovda LR, M L Rose ML. Hoary alyssum (Berteroa incana) toxicity in a herd of broodmare horses. Vet Hum Toxicol 1993;35(1):39-40.

Hovda LR. Immunodeficiency diseases in older foals. Equine Practice 1993;24-27.

Hovda LR, MaManus AC. Yohimbine for treatment of amitraz poisoning in dogs. Vet Hum Tox 1993;35(4):329.

Gertner E, Marshall PS, Filandrinos DT, et al. Complications resulting from the use of Chinese herbal medications containing undeclared prescription drugs. Arthritis & Rheumatism

Vatandoost H, Mirakbari SM, Filandrinos DT. A study of poisonings in adults at the poison control center in Loghman Hakeem Hospital, Tehran, Iran from April 25, 2000 to April 25, 2001. IJMT.

Hovda LR, Hooser SB. Toxicology of newer pesticides for use in dogs and cats. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2002;32(2):455-467.

Lee JA, Budgin JB, Mauldin EA. Acute necrotizing dermatitis with septicemia following
application of a d-limonene-based insecticidal shampoo in cat. J Am Vet Med Assoc 221, No. 2, July 15, 2002 pp. 258-262.

Lee JA, Drobatz KD. Characterization of the clinical characteristics, electrolytes, acid-base and renal parameters in male cats with urethral obstruction. J Vet Emerg Crit Care Soc
2003;13(4):227-233.

Lee JA, Hinchcliff KW, Piercy R, et al. Effects of racing and nontraining on plasma thyroid hormone concentrations in sled dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224(2):226-231.

Mittleman E, Weisse C, Mehler SJ, Lee JA. Fracture of an endoluminal nitinol stent used for the treatment of tracheal collapse in a dog. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1217-1221.

Lee JA, Drobatz KD, Koch MW, King LG. Indications for and outcome of positive-pressure ventilation in cats: 53 cats (1993-2002). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226(6):924-931.

Quandt JE, Lee JA, Powell L. Analgesia in the Critically Ill Patient. Compendium for Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian 2005;27(6):433-446.

Simmons S, Dincesen A, Murray H, Dunrud T, Burh B, Angle C. ” Anybody’s Dream”: A decision case of marketing alternative crops. J Natural Res Life Sci Educ 2005;34:29-35.

Handley H, Nelson DA. Ecological and phylogenetic influences on song sharing in song birds. Ethology 2005;111:221-238.

Lee JA, Drobatz KJ. Historical and physical parameters as predictors of severe hyperkalemia in male cats with urethral obstruction. J Vet Emerg Crit Care Soc 2006;16(2):104-111.

Estrin M., Wehausen C., Lee JA. DIC in cats. A retrospective study investigating the diagnosis of DIC in cats. J Vet Intern Med 2006;20:1289-1290.

Cargill E, Lee J. Warm weather toxins. National Assoc Vet Tech in Amer 2009;20-23.

Marshall J, Lee J. Summer hazards to avoid in our pets and patients. National Assoc Vet Tech in Amer 2009;44-49.

Marshall J. Emesis – is it for your patient? Veterinary Technician 2009;36-40.

Peterson K, Beymer J, Rudloff E, O’Brien M. Airway obstruction in a dog after Diffenbachia ingestion. J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2009;19(6):635-9.

Killos MB, Graham LF, Lee JA. Comparison of two anesthetic protocols for feline blood donation. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia 2010;37(3):230-239.

Orcutt BS, Lee J, Bianco D. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia and severe thrombocytopenia in dogs: 12 cases (2001-2008). J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2010;20(3):338-345.

Tart K, Babski D, Lee J. Potential risks, prognostic indicators, and diagnostic and treatment modalities affecting survival in dogs with presumptive aspiration pneumonia: 125 cases (2005-2008). J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2010;20(3):319-329.

Marshall J, Brutlag A. Top 10 human medications ingested by pets. N Assoc Vet Tech Assoc 2010;pp32-38.

Guindon S, Lee J. Plant toxicosis in birds: Educating owners. The Veterinary Nurse 2010;1(1):36-41.

Lee JA, Herndon WE, Rishniw M. The effect of noncardiac disease on plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentration in dogs. J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2011;21(1):5-12.

Kaplan MI, Lee J, Hovda LR, Brutlag A. Adverse effects associated with inadvertent intravenous penicillin G procaine-penicillin G benzathine administration in 2 dogs and a cat. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2011;239(4): 507-510.

Fernandez AL, Lee JA, Rahilly L, Hovda LR, Brutlag AB, Engebretsen K. The use of intravenous lipid emulsions as an antidote in veterinary toxicology: a review. J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2011;21(4):309-320.

Gray S, Lee JA, Hovda L, et al. Zinc phosphide rodenticide toxicity in dogs: 362 cases (2004-2009). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2011;239(5):646-651.

Peterson K, Lee JA, Hovda LR. Phenylpropanolamine toxicosis in dogs: 170 cases (2004-2009). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2011;239(11):1463-1469.

Clarke DL, Lee JA, Murphy LA, Reineke EL. Use of intravenous lipid emulsion to treat ivermectin toxicosis in a Border collie. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2011;239(10):1328-1333.

Lancaster A, Lee JA, Hovda LR, et al. Sleep aid toxicosis in dogs: 317 cases (2004-2010). J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2011;21(6):658-665.

Reinker LN, Lee JA, Hovda LR, Rishniw M. Clinical signs of cardiovascular effects secondary to suspected pimobendan toxicosis in 5 of 7 dogs. J Am An Hosp Assoc 2012;48(4):1-6.

Lee JA. Top 5 emergency room mistakes: Ask the Expert. Clinician’s Brief 2012:10(8):21-24.

Khorzad R, Lee JA, Hovda LR, Whelan M, et al. Baclofen toxicosis in dogs and cats: 145 cases (2004-2010). JAVMA 2012:241(8):1059-1064.

Lee JA. Acute Abdominal Pain. Clinician’s Brief 2012;10(10):12-13.

Thomas DE, Lee JA, Hovda LR. Retrospective evaluation of toxicosis from selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants: 313 dogs (2005-2010). J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2012;22(6):674–681.

Lee JA. Are we abandoning our new graduates? Veterinary Team Brief 2013;1(1):42-43.

Lee JA. Decontaminating the poisoned patient. Clinician’s Brief 2013;11(3):13-15.

Lee JA. The impaired veterinarian: Recognizing depression & possible suicide. Veterinary Team Brief 2013;1(2):12-13.

Lee JA, Welch S. Activated charcoal: To use or not to use. Veterinary Medicine;2013:124-132.

Baton BL, Simmonds EE, Lee JA, Alwood AJ. The novel use of high-dose insulin therapy and intravenous lipid emulsion to treat severe, refractory diltiazem toxicosis in a dog. J Vet Emerg Critical Care 2013;23(3):321-327.

Pugh CM, Lee JA, Bloch CP, Sweeney J, Hovda LR. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) toxicosis in cats: 33 cases (2004-2010). Accepted JVECC, pending publication in 2013.

Almgren C, Lee JA. Serotonin Syndrome. Accepted Clinician’s Brief, pending publication in 2013.

Abstracts

Filandrinos DT, Sioris LJ. Transient elevation of liver function tests following ingestion of black locust seeds. Abstract Vet Human Toxicology 1992;34(4):351.

Filandrinos DT, Zunker RJ, Sioris LJ. Costs incurred from unnecessary hospital visits if a poison center was unavailable. Abstract Vet Human Toxicology 1993;35(4):323.

Swanson L, Filandrinos DT, Shevlin JM, Willett JR. Death from accidental ingestion of an ammonium bifluoride containing glass etching compound. Abstract Vet Human Toxicology 1993;35(4):321.

Gualtieri J, Filandrinos DT. Phenylbutazone ingestion complicated by coagulopathy and suspected rhabdomyolysis. Abstract Vet Human Toxicology 1994;36(4):367.

Filandrinos DT, Engebresten K. Fluid loss and water intoxication leading to hyponatremia and status epilepticus in amoxicillin overdose. Abstract J Tox Clin Toxicology 1997;35(5):497.

Filandrinos DT, Kingston RL. High alcohol content hand sanitizers: Abuse potential and safety profile. Abstract. European Association of Poison Centers and Clinical Toxicologists. May 200.

Gualtieri J, Filandrinos DT. Firebreather’s Lung: A pulmonary finding in the butane inhalant abuser. Abstract. J Tox Clin Toxicology 2000;38(2):241.

Lee JA, Drobatz KJ. Physical parameters as predictors of severe hyperkalemia in cats with urethral obstruction. Abstract presentation, 7th IVECCS Symposium, Orlando, FL. (15min, September 2000). Published Abstract Proceedings 2000;789.

Lee JA, Otto CM, King LG. Septic peritonitis and antibiotic therapy in dogs: a retrospective study of 23 cases. Abstract proceeding, 7th IVECCS Symposium. 2000;789.

Lee JA. Abstract summary on Efficacy and Safety of Recombinant Human Activated Protein C for Severe Sepsis, from N Engl J Med. JVECC 2001;11(2):127.

Lee JA, Drobatz KD, Koch MW, King LG. Ventilator management, organ failure, and outcome: 53 cats (1993-2002). Abstract presentation, 8th IVECCS Symposium, San Antonio, TX. (15 min, September 2002). Published Abstract proceedings 2002;780. Published JVECCS 2002;12(3):193.

Lee JA, Hinchcliff KW, Piercy RJ, et al. Effects of racing and detraining on thyroid hormone concentrations in Iditarod Sled Dogs. Abstract poster presentation, ACVIM, Charlotte, NC (June 2003). Published Abstract Proceedings 2003. Published JVIM 2003;17(3):432.

Lee JA, Hinchcliff KW, Munro DS, Benson CE, Rankin S. Nalidixic Acid-resistant MDR-AmpC Salmonella enterica serotype Newport isolated from a canine raw meat diet. Abstract presentation, ISDVMA, Anchorage, AK (September 2004).

Angle C, et al. Characterization of antibiotic resistance in E. coli from river systems in rural Chile. Abstract, Conference Animal with Disease Disease (October 2004).

Lee JA, Herndon W, Drobatz KJ. Evaluation of a new brain natriuretic peptide assay in dogs. Abstract presentation, ACVIM, Baltimore, MA (June 2005).

Estrin MA, Wehausen CE, Jessen CR, Lee JA. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) in Cats: 86 cases (1990-2004). Abstract presentation, 11th IVECCS Symposium, Atlanta, GA. (15 min, September 2005).

Alesch K, Bowen S, Sioris K, Wildern C. Proton pump inhibitors and increased risk of fracture. Abstract presentation, Florida Pharmacy Association Annual Meeting and Convention, June 2007.

Killos M, Graham L, Olmstead E, Lee JA. Comparison of two anesthetic protocols for feline blood donation. Abstract presentation, ACVA Annual Meeting, 2007.

Brutlag AG, Hovda LR, Della Ripa MA. Corneal ulceration following Walkingstick envenomation. Abstract presentation, North American Congress of Clinical Toxicology Annual Meeting, Toronto, Canada. September 2008. Published in Clinical Toxicology 2008;46(7):621.

Peterson K, Lee JA, Hovda LR. Phenylpropanolamine toxicosis in dogs: 170 cases (2004-2009). Abstract presentation, IVECCS, 2010.

Gray S, Lee JA, Hovda L, Brutlag AG. Zinc phosphide rodenticide toxicosis in dogs: 362 cases (2004-2009). Abstract presentation, IVECCS, 2010.

Khorzad S, Lee JA, Whelan M, et al. Baclofen toxicosis in dogs and cats: 145 cases (2004-2010). Abstract presentation, IVECCS, 2011.

Lancaster AR, Lee JA, Hovda LR, et al. Sleep aid toxicosis in dogs: 317 cases (2004-2010). Abstract presentation, IVECCS, 2011.

Gray S. The use of intralipid therapy in selected toxicoses. Resident Focus Session, IVECCS, 2011.

Brutlag AG, Kingston R, Forrester MB, Borron SW. Pet poisonings involving new, EPA-approved bromethalin rodenticides: Implications for pets and humans. North American Congress of Clinical Toxicology (NACCT) 2013. Accepted for poster presentation, Oct 2, 2013.

Borron SW, Forrester MB, Kingston R, Brutlag AG. Bromethalin (BR) vs. long-acting anticoagulant (LAAC) rodenticides: A 10-year comparison of exposures and toxicity. North American Congress of Clinical Toxicology (NACCT) 2013. Accepted for poster presentation, Oct 2, 2013.

Book Chapters

Harris CR, Filandrinos DT. Chapter 22: Mushrooms. Emergency Management of Selected Drugs of Abuse. American College of Emergency Physicians, 2000.

Filandrinos DT. Chapter 23: PCP. Emergency Management of Selected Drugs of Abuse. American College of Emergency Physicians, 2000.

Filandrinos DT, Harris CR. Chapter 26: Ketamine. Emergency Management of Selected Drugs of Abuse. American College of Emergency Physicians, 2000.
1993;35:329. 1995;38(5):614.
Lee JA, Drobatz KJ. Respiratory Distress and Cyanosis in Dogs. In King LG, ed. Textbook of Respiratory Diseases in the Dog and Cat. Elsevier Science Health Science December 2003, ISBN: 072168067

Lee JA, Powell LL. The physiological effects of pregnancy and the associated effects on anesthesia, drug administration, and the critically ill patient. In review.

Filandrinos DT, Yentsch TR, Meyers KL. St. John’s Wort. In Tracy T, Kingston R, ed. Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology of Herbal Products. Humana Press, 2nd Edition. 2007.

Hall K, Lee JA. Non-respiratory look-alikes. In Silverstein D, Hopper K, ed. Saunders Manual of Critical Care Medicine. Elsevier Science Health Science. ISBN: 141602591XISBN-13: 9781416025917, Copyright 2008.

Quandt J, Lee JA. Analgesia in the critically ill patient. In Silverstein D, Hopper K, ed. Saunders Manual of Critical Care Medicine. Elsevier Science Health Science. ISBN: 141602591X, ISBN-13: 9781416025917, Copyright 2008.

Hovda LR, Murphy M. Toxin Exposures in Small Animals. In: Bonagura JD and Twedt DC, eds. Current Veterinary Therapy XIV, Saunders Elsevier, St. Louis, MO, 2008. pp 92-94.

Lee JA. Antifreeze Treatment. In Rush J, Rozanski L, Powell L, eds. Morbidity and Mortality in Veterinary Medicine. Elsevier Science Health Science. Expected year of publication 2010.

Brutlag AG. Topical Toxins. In Ettinger SJ and Feldman EC, eds. Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine: Diseases of the Dog and Cat. 7th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier, 2010.

Brutlag AG. Chemical Toxicities. In Ettinger SJ and Feldman EC, eds. Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine: Diseases of the Dog and Cat. 7th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier, 2010.

Hovda LR. Common Plant Toxicities. In Ettinger SJ and Feldman EC, eds. Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine: Diseases of the Dog and Cat. 7th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier, 2010.

Hovda LR. Street Drug Toxicity. In Ettinger SJ and Feldman EC, eds. Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine: Diseases of the Dog and Cat. 7th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier, 2010.

Lee JA. Decontamination and Detoxification of the Poisoned Patient. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Lee JA. Emergency Management of the Poisoned Patient. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Hovda LR. Antidotes and Other Useful Drugs. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Adams C, Thrall MA. Ethylene Glycol. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Adams C. Calcipotriene. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Adams C. Calcium Supplements. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Adams C. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Keyler D, Peterson M. Coral Snakes. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Peterson M, Adams C. Scorpions. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Peterson M, Hovda LR. Bufo Toads. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Keyler D, Peterson M. Pit Vipers. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Peterson M, Adams C. Brown Recluse Spiders. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Peterson M, Adams C. Black Widow Spiders. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Adams C, Hovda LR. Wasps, Hornets, Bees. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Adams C. Mycotoxins – Aflatoxins. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Adams C. Onions and Garlic. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Adams C, Hovda LR. Bromethalin. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Adams C. Cholecalciferol. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Angle C. Batteries. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Angle C. Phenols/Pine Oil. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Angle C. Sodium Fluoride Toothpastel. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Cohen S, Brutlag A. Tea Tree Oil. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Cohen S, Brutlag A. Mothballs. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Brutlag A. Acids. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Brutlag A. Alkalies. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Cargill E, Hovda LR. Oxalates – Insoluble. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Cargill E, Hovda LR. Oxalates – Soluble. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Cargill E, Hovda LR. Rhododendrons. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Cargill E, Martinson K. Cardiac Glycosides. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Martinson K, Hovda LR. Yews. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Martinson K, Hovda LR. Lilies. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Compaion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

LeMaster SH. Hydrocarbons. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

LeMaster SH. Dextromethorphan. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Peterson K. Glues/Adhesives. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Peterson K. Veterinary NSAIDS. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Peterson K. Methionine. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Sioris K, Engebretsen K. Pharmacology. In Hess DR, ed. Respiratory Care: Principles & Practice. Expected year of publication 2011.

Sioris K, Engebretsen K. Opioids. In Harris CR, ed. Emergency Management of Selected Drugs of Abuse. Expected year of publication 2011.

Sioris K. Atypical Antipsychotics. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Sioris K, Filandrinos DT. Decongestants. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Sioris K . Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Sioris L , Haak LE. Hydrofluoric Acid. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Sioris L, Haak LE. Soaps, Detergents, and Fabric Softeners. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Hovda LR. Miscellaneous Hallucinogens and Dissociative Agents. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Hovda LR. Opioids. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Clark DL, Lee JA. Vitamins and Minerals. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Clark DL, Lee JA. Paintballs. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Gualtieri J. Organophosphate and Carbamate Insecticides. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Clark DL, Lee JA. Ivermectin, Moxidectin, Milbemycin. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Craft E, Lee JA. Grapes and Raisins. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Hovda T, Lee JA. Glow Jewelry (Dibutyl Phthalate). In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Lee JA. Hops. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Liu D, Lee JA. Macadamia Nuts. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Liu D, Lee JA. Xylitol. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Gray S. Phosphides. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Gray S, Lee JA. Salt (Table Salt, Ice Melt). In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Marshall J, Lee JA. Blood and Bone Meal. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Marshall J, Lee JA. Fertilizers. In Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

Books

Martinson K, Hovda LR, Murphy M. Plants Poisonous or Harmful to Horses in the North Central United States. University of Minnesota Extension, Minnesota Racing Commission, and College of Veterinary Medicine.

Martinson K, Becker R, Hovda LR, Murphy M. Plants commonly found in established Minnesota horse pastures. University of Minnesota Extension publication. 2009.

Lee JA. It’s a Dog’s Life… but It’s Your Carpet: Everything you ever wanted to know about your four-legged friend. Three Rivers Press, a subsidiary of Random House. April 2008.

Lee JA. It’s a Cat’s World… You Just Live In It: Everything you ever wanted to know about your furry feline. Three Rivers Press, a subsidiary of Random House. December 2008.

Osweiler G, Hovda LR, Brutlag A, Lee JA, eds. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. 1st ed. Ames, IO: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.

The University of Minnesota

The University of Minnesota is among the largest public research universities in the country, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional students a multitude of opportunities for study and research.

 

Nationwide

Nationwide_2014_new

providing valuable information on pet health and safety. Nationwide, the nation’s oldest and largest pet health insurance provider, is partnering with Pet Poison Helpline. Our common goal is to educate pet lovers on pet poisoning hazards, as our shared passion for pets drives our commitment to

See our pet owner videos on cat and dog poisons that could be potentially dangerous to your pet, thanks to Nationwide Insurance!

 

 

American Kennel Club Reunite

AKC ReuniteEffective March 16, 2009, Pet Poison Helpline (PPH) has partnered with the AKC Reunite program to help you provide the best care for your pet. AKC Reunite is the nation’s largest not-for-profit pet ID and recovery service with the mission of increasing the number of lost pets that can be recovered. If you’re enrolled in AKC Reunite via Protection+, your enrollment includes access to PPH–the top toxicologist specialists out there–to ensure that your pet will receive expert help should they ever be exposed to a poison.

 

VitusVet

VitusVet LogoVitusVet, a mobile app solutions provider, has partnered with Pet Poison Helpline to give pet owners and veterinary professionals access to potentially lifesaving information from an app on their mobile phones, including Pet Poison Helpline’s extensive database of potential pet poisons and click to call functionality. VitusVet’s cloud-based mobile app gives pet owners the ability to access, track, and share their pet’s complete medical information whenever, and wherever, to help create a better health outcome for the pet.

See how Pet Poison Helpline has helped thousands of pet owners and veterinarians, just like you!

Pet Poison Helpline is the best resource for fast and thorough information on toxic exposure to pets. Whether for a patient in the clinic or for a client calling for more information for their pets, their knowledgeable, caring staff have given me valuable medical information and peace of mind.
-Kate An Hunter, DVM (Woodbury, MN)

I’m writing to thank you for helping save my dog’s life. On May 7, my miniature Dachshund, Kristi, ate some rat poison. I took her to our Emergency Animal Hospital, and was instructed to contact you immediately, which I did from one of their exam rooms. That night, and throughout the next few days, you consulted with the vets on call, offering life-saving advice (including a lipid IV drip) that enabled Kristi to pull through.

One week later, Kristi was back at home and doing well. Now, almost one month later, she’s resumed all her normal activities and has received a great health report from our veterinarian.

I will always be grateful for your help and advice. You offer a wonderful service!
-Fran W.

Megan This last summer our almost 5 year old Black Lab, Megan, got herself into a little predicament while staying with her grandma 🙂 She is very mischievous and found herself an ant trap to munch on. This dog as a stomach of steel but we were still worried sick so we hopped in the car and got to her as fast as possible and then rushed her to the nearest vet. The vet was so kind and saw us ASAP without an appointment. She had us call the Pet Poison Helpline (which we had never heard of) before she treated Megan so she knew what she was dealing with. Thank goodness they told us she would be just fine based upon her size and the small amount of poison she consumed. We were so relieved!!!!! Thank you so much for the help, we are forever grateful and make sure that if any of our 3 dogs are staying with someone they have the number for the Pet Poison Hotline! It was money well spent!!!!
-Jessica S.

Pet Poison Helpline is my go-to resource for poison control and toxicology information. I am always impressed by the rapid response and depth of toxicological knowledge shared by Drs. Brutlag and Lee. The team at Pet Poison Helpline are professional, courteous, and a superb resource for veterinary professionals and pet owners alike.
-Janet Tobassen Crosby, DVM (About.com Guide to Veterinary Medicine)

Thanks so much for your help! I called a week ago Sunday. My baby Belle Masakowski (5 yr old lab mix) ate a thermcare heating pad containing iron. I was in a complete panic and your professional helpful advice helped me get through the crisis. Belle had no side effects and is healthy and well. Thanks again from the bottom of my heart. .
-Venus and Belle M.

CCI05212013_0000Thanks for saving my dog! We appreciate all that you do. I’ve enclosed a picture of my two girls, Velvet the daschund and Hazel the cockerspaniel. Hazel is the one that swallowed the blood pressure medicine. All better and back to her regular self. Thanks so much!
-David H.

We use Pet Poison Helpline all the time!!
-New York Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center

Communicating with Pet Poison Helpline was absolutely seamless. I spoke with a kind, articulate, and very knowledgeable DVM, and received the information that I needed to help my patient. I’ll be using them again!
-Dr. Indu M.

Thank you so much for this service — I called last night after my dog ate a year’s supply of Heartguard+. With your guidance and information, I was able to help my dog without having to go to an emergency vet (2 hour drive away…) I’m happy to report that everything’s fine this morning, we’re back to wagging tails today! Thanks a million!!!
-Margaret and Einstein T.

The veterinarian I spoke with was very helpful, patient and understanding. Made me ALMOST calm about the situation. Most excellent service.
-Chuck E.

CarlyI wanted to thank your for your helpfullness and kindness when my cat, Carly, got sick. She is just about 100% recovered, and I know she couldn’t have survived without the advice you gave me.
-Donna

Thank you Pet Poison Helpline for a wonderful externship! I learned so much and am impressed with the positive impact you have on the veterinary world!
-Jen G.

We wanted to thank you so much for all of your help for our dog, Saffie. She accidentally ate our daughter’s ADHD medication and got extremely ill. The emergency vet said if it hadn’t been for you, our dog would probably have died from being given a sedative that was contra-indicated for that particular medicine. Your help was invaluable to them! Thank you again so much! Saffie is doing much better and her prognosis is good.
-Julie P.

Please accept my deepest appreciation and gratitude saving my Daphne’s life! She is so precious to us. Everyone loves her, such a joy to be around. I sing your praises! I will never forget your help! Thank you and God Bless you all.
-Judith J.

I used your services last week after my dog ate tile adhesive. The vet I spoke with was very helpful and was able to put my mind at ease. I’m happy to report the Stitch had no adverse effects from eating the adhesive and is doing great 🙂 Thanks for the awesome work you do!!
-Ashley L.

EuriThank you for helping my boy, Euri 🙂 I called you because he ate a peony petal, but he is fine now!
-Becky A.

Thank you! I have toddlers and pets! You will be a great help if they decide to feed the dogs something!
-Melissa P.

We really love to share your postings. How many thousands of pets get saved daily, weekly, yearly because of you all! We thank you!!
-Romie Lane Pet Hospital Business

Thanks for a fantastic service when I needed it. Service is professional, yet kind, courteous & understanding.
-Jennifer B.

The night before Valentines Day, we left our little Doxie mix rescue alone for a few hours. We came home to find that he had somehow got hold of an unopened box of chocolates and eaten every single one. I called the poison control number and they were very efficient and helped me tremendously. They analyzed the contents he had consumed. They instructed me to bring him to the emergency vet hospital in our area. He only weighs 14 lbs and what he had eaten could have been deadly. He spent 2 nights in the ER and is now back to his perky little self. Thank you to the considerate staff who helped us through this very scary situation.
-Sandra S.

Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! You are the best and have saved my beautiful Jasmine twice!!! We thank you!!!!!!!
-Karen G.

Pet Poison Helpline helped me and my dog – I highly recommend it.
-Kristen B.

Thank you so much for helping me and my kitten Maybelline! 🙂
-Lacey D.

It is with deep pleasure that I inform you that my dog Breanna Nicole has recovered after swallowing some blood pressure medication. Due to your staff’s quick thinking and knowledge, Breanna Nicole did not suffer at all! I am so thankful to you for your kindness and great work that you do for animals.
-Betty D.

You guys rock…and have most likely saved Manny the Monster, all 12.5 pounds of him. from severe issues not to mention my peace of mind.
-G. Paris P.

Last night I posted a photo of a plant that my cat got into. Both Google image search and crowd sourcing confirmed it was a Dieffenbachia. They’re harmful to the cat that ate it, so I called Pet Poison Helpline and they helped me by giving me step by step instructions on what to do to prevent her from getting more sick, exactly what to look out for, and when to bring her to the vet if necessary. Gracie is fine now, super happy about the milk and canned food they recommended. It was the best money I could’ve spent to make sure my 11 year old cat was going to be ok after hitting the poison kitty salad bar.
-Betsy S.

I just wanted to send a little note to say thank you for your assistance today with my dog, Addie. I did not know there was such a thing as a poison control for pets. I discovered you purely by accident thanks to the National Poison Control Center. I will share your contact info with all of my pet owner friends. Again thank you very much.
-Eunice T.

My cat swallowed my blood pressure medication this morning. Oh no! I called my vet immediately and they told me to call you with the details, which I did. I just want to thank you for your excellent service. It’s good to know that you exist. I will be giving all my friends with pets your phone number to put on their refrigerator. Thanks again for being there.
-Jill W.

Last night I was in a panic! one of the biggest loves of my life, my little Frenchie Noir, ingested paintballs. Melanie saved my sanity! AND my pocketbook as well. She guided me through this scary time with knowledge and a special calmness that will not be forgotten anytime soon. Noir is fine and doing well today. I cannot thank you enough. You are amazing and being able to talk to someone who answered ALL my questions and my concerns in my time of need was WELL WORTH the money for peace of mind. Thank you, thank you!
-Molly C.

ArtyArty swallowed one of my pills: I did everything you advised me to do and watched him all day (also calling you several times to check if he was OK). He is fine now and back to his old self!!! Thanks so much for having this site for us to call and manning it 24 hours.
-Barbara G.

Statement of Professional Practice

SafetyCall International (SCI) and its Pet Poison Helpline (PPH) division is an independent, multi-disciplinary, 24/7 animal and human poison control and adverse event management center headquartered in Bloomington, MN, and licensed by the Minnesota State Boards of Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, and Pharmacy. It is privately owned and operated by a partnership that is primarily composed of veterinarians, physicians, and pharmacists (PharmDs) whose founders began working together in 1982. Our practitioners are internationally recognized by veterinary and human medical professionals, regulators, and professional and trade associations throughout the world for their knowledge and expertise in clinical toxicology, product safety, and adverse event management.

As a multi-disciplinary poison control and adverse event management center, Pet Poison Helpline and SafetyCall are staffed with experts in clinical veterinary and human toxicology, emergency medicine, internal medicine, forensic toxicology, adverse event management/reporting, regulatory affairs, and pharmacovigilance. Collectively, our experts have managed more than three million adverse event, product safety, and poisoning cases, positively impacting the safety of products, animals, and people worldwide. Our veterinary team includes diplomates of the American Board of Toxicology (ABT), the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology (ABVT), the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM), and the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (ACVECC), as well as more than 100 certified/licensed/registered veterinary technicians, including American Veterinary Emergency Critical Care Technicians (AVECCT). Our human medical experts include physicians with board certification in Emergency Medicine, Preventive Medicine (Occupational and Environmental Medicine), Addiction Medicine and Medical Toxicology, as well as pharmacists (PharmDs, including many who have completed residencies and fellowships in Clinical Toxicology), nurses, pharmacy technicians, paramedics, and emergency medical technicians, several of whom are Certified Specialists in Poison Information (CSPI). Our professional staff are the core of PPH/SCI and our most valued resource. To maintain and advance our expertise, and to help our staff grow professionally and personally, we are committed to supporting their pursuit of specialty certification and continuing education.

Pet Poison Helpline and SafetyCall have a long-standing history of academic and scholarly work focused on teaching, committee service, research, and policy development. This includes a formal affiliation with the University of Minnesota’s College of Pharmacy, which began in 1982. Today, multiple partners and staff have full and adjunct faculty appointments at the College of Pharmacy where they teach courses in Clinical Toxicology, Addiction Medicine, Toxinology, Herbal and Medicinal Therapeutic Agents, and others in the Graduate School. Partners and staff also have faculty appointments at the University of Minnesota’s College of Veterinary Medicine, where they team-teach Veterinary Toxicology as part of the core curriculum and participate in population medicine courses. To foster experiential training and student mentorship outside the classroom, we also offer formal clerkships and clinical rotations to veterinary and pharmacy students.

The development of expertise is one of our enduring core values. To advance the specialty of clinical toxicology, we have also fully funded multiple clinical residencies for veterinarians (2) and pharmacists (7) in partnership with the University of Minnesota (UMN) College of Veterinary Medicine as well as the UMN College of Pharmacy and Regions Hospital, a teaching hospital and Level 1 Trauma Center in St. Paul, MN.

As experts in the field of clinical toxicology and leaders in adverse event management and poison control services, PPH/SCI is actively engaged in scholarship and research with the goal of advancing knowledge within the discipline, for fellow veterinary and medical professionals, and for the public. We have been invited to lecture at many major North American veterinary, medical, and regulatory conventions, many veterinary colleges, and regulatory agencies including FDA, EPA, and Health Canada’s PMRA. Collectively, we have published hundreds of peer-reviewed scientific articles, abstracts, and textbook chapters, and edited multiple textbooks.

Driven by our desire to educate, we also provide complimentary scientific webinars on veterinary toxicology, adverse event management, and product safety, that are attended by thousands of professionals each year and archived in our online library. To keep veterinary practitioners informed on emerging trends in toxicology, we publish quarterly newsletters with materials valuable to them, their staff, and their clients. We also maintain an online, publicly available ‘poison directory’ detailing more than 300 individual toxicants and providing information on species risks, expected severity of poisoning, clinical signs, photos, and more.

As credentialed experts with multiple decades’ experience in adverse event management and post-market surveillance, PPH/SCI staff have advised, consulted, and worked in collaboration with industry and US and Canadian regulatory agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA).

Pet Poison Helpline and SafetyCall are active members in more than 20 professional and trade associations including the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, the Council for Responsible Nutrition, the Household and Commercial Products Association, the American Herbal Products Association, the United Natural Products Alliance, the Natural Products Association, the Animal Health Institute, the Personal Care Products Council, the American Botanical Council, the American Society for Quality, the Regulatory Affairs Professionals Society, the Society of Consumer Affairs Professionals in Business (SOCAP International), and the American Association of Poison Control Centers. We are also a preferred supplier for the National Animal Supplement Council (NASC). Participation in these organizations allows us to remain at the forefront of professional and industry knowledge and policy which contributes to our expertise and benefits our clients. We also encourage employees to be active in these associations as it helps them grow and develop into creative thought leaders committed to acting and delivering on their responsibilities.

Over the past decade, we are grateful and humbled by the accolades and awards received in recognition of our contributions. However, none are more meaningful than repeatedly being named a Top Workplace in Minnesota. This award, organized in partnership with the Minneapolis/St Paul Star Tribune newspaper, is based upon feedback from an employee survey regarding company leadership, culture, communications, career opportunities, workplace environment, managerial skills, pay and benefits. Over 2,000 organizations were invited to participate in the survey, and over 140,000 employees shared their views. Other notable recognitions include the Herbal Industry Leader Award (2021) from the American Herbal Products Association which recognizes companies or organizations that work to move the industry forward by exceeding the standards of normal business practices; along with individual recognitions from the Household and Commercial Products Association including the Chairman’s Award (2013) and volunteer recognition awards (Pest Management Division, 2018; Air Care Division, 2019).

Collectively, our mission is a simple one: to make the world a safer place for people and animals. We have worked toward that mission for over 35 years and, through thoughtful planning, cultivation of new leaders, experts, and educators, have set the stage to continue on for the next 35 years.

What does this service provide for me & my pet?

We are a 24-hour pet poison control center which provides treatment advice for pet owners and veterinarians caring for potentially poisoned pets. We will make an assessment as to the risk of harm to the pet, provide initial recommendations for treatment that can be provided at home, and, when necessary, direct you to your veterinarian for further evaluation and treatment. We will then provide the veterinarian with the necessary treatment advice to assist them in delivering the appropriate care for the pet.

Is there a fee for this service?

Yes. There is a one-time consultation fee of $65 per incident. This fee covers not only the initial consultation, but also any follow-up consultations made with the pet owner and/or veterinarian.

Why do we charge for this service?

Our sole purpose is to ensure that pets stay healthy. Our single goal is to prevent their injury or illness from potential poisonings. To accomplish this, we operate a 24-hour pet poison control center which requires considerable effort, resources, and expense. Unlike public poison control centers in the human sector, veterinary poison control is allotted no tax dollars to support their existence. Pet Poison Helpline does not receive any state, federal, or other public funding. If we did not charge, we could not exist.

What if my pet’s treatment requires additional phone calls to you?

Once the initial consultation is paid, there will be no further costs regarding the case. You will not be charged again for follow-up guidance.

What is the procedure if my pet needs immediate veterinary treatment?

We provide you with a case number. You simply relay the case number, along with our phone number, to your veterinarian. Your veterinarian can then call us and receive treatment advice throughout the entire course of treatment for no additional fee.

Why would my veterinarian need your assistance?

Poison control and toxicology is a specialty. Also, poisoning incidents are not frequently encountered by the veterinarian and when they are, each incident usually involves different substances and circumstances. Therefore, most veterinarians appreciate a resource for obtaining vital information for poisoning emergencies.

Is there any animal, or toxic ingestion with which you cannot assist us?

No. We have the staff and the expertise to confidently deal with any type of exposure with any species of animal.

Who staffs this service?

Pet Poison Helpline is staffed by trained veterinary health experts, including: veterinarians, licensed veterinary technicians, clinical toxicologists, board-certified veterinary toxicologists, board-certified internal medicine and emergency critical care specialists, pharmacologists, and other health care professionals. All of our medical staff members have received extensive training in the area of veterinary toxicology. We keep abreast of new research and information in the field of toxicology to ensure that every caller receives the most accurate treatment advice possible for the care of the pet.

What is the SafetyCall Pet Poison Helpline?

Pet Poison Helpline is a division of SafetyCall International. SafetyCall International is a human and animal poison control center whose staff has greater than 30 years experience in assisting pet owners and veterinarians with the treatment of pet poisonings.

Culture Statement

We all come together for the same purpose every day: to make the world a safer place. We come to work with a positive, intentional and energetic presence, caring for our clients, callers and our extended community. We support and care for each other as members of our family, both in and out of the office. We find great joy in giving back to our community through service events and supporting affected communities in times of need. We openly welcome all visitors and strive to make them feel like they are family. We celebrate each other’s life milestones and accomplishments, yet we do not always need a specific reason to toast or honor one another. While we all have the same end goal, we celebrate each other’s differences and are inclusive of all.

We instill trust in each other to provide the best care to support our mission of making the world a safer place. We work hard as individuals and as a team to strive for excellence in all we do. We pursue personal growth and learning with a desire to make ourselves better and become masters at what we do! We consistently challenge each other, pushing each other to be the best. We value initiative and aggressiveness to get things done—we have a bias to action!

We have an open-door policy and are transparent with communication. We welcome ideas and feedback. We work off each other’s strengths, placing people in roles that allow them to succeed. We are honest and admit to our mistakes, learn from them, and move on. If something is not working, we change it! We communicate openly and respectfully. We behave professionally both in and out of the office as our reputation is extremely important. We show gratitude and do not take things for granted.

In this spirit, we like to have fun and look forward to socializing with each other! A multitude of social traditions are revered and valued by all — from the many holiday celebrations, to lawn bowling, wine tastings, cooking competitions, and dressing in costume or in our best, we truly enjoy each other’s company and never need an excuse to celebrate and have fun while on our journey together to make the world a safer place!

Pet Poison Helpline is a 24-hour animal poison control service available throughout the U.S., Canada, and the Caribbean for pet owners and veterinary professionals who require assistance with treating a potentially poisoned pet.

Our Purpose

Our single goal is to keep pets healthy by preventing their injury or illness from potential poisonings. To accomplish this, we operate a 24-hour pet poison control center, so you can have around-the-clock help when you need it most.

Our Values

Pet Poison Helpline is an independent, nationally recognized, triple licensed animal poison control center providing unmatched professional leadership and expertise. With availability in multiple veterinary specialties and an extensive data base of household and commercial products, we save pet’s lives.

pet poison mission

Our mission is to save pets’ lives and make the world a safer place for animals.

Why Pet Poison Helpline

  • 24/7 access to experts
    24/7 access to experts

    specially trained in veterinary toxicology, including veterinarians who are board-certified in internal medicine (DACVIM), emergency and critical care (DACVECC), and toxicology (DABVT, DABT).

  • Our experience
    Our experience

    We have managed over 1,000,000 cases involving pet poisoning. Our treatment guidelines are always being reviewed and updated to reflect the best information available so that our callers get the best possible care.

  • Veterinarian specialists
    Veterinarian specialists

    We’re the only poison control with veterinarians board-certified in internal medicine (DACVIM), emergency and critical care (DACVECC), and toxicology (DABVT, DABT) – which is imperative if your pet is critically ill from a potential poisoning. Drs. Ahna Brutlag and Sherry Ripple (Welch) have been elected as ABVT’s President-Elect and Treasurer for the years 2020-2022. Dr. Brutlag will assume the President role in August of 2022.

  • Why we charge
    Why we charge

    We’re the most cost-effective pet poison control center out there, which is helpful in this current economy. Unfortunately, because there is no public funding to help run animal poison control centers, there is a small per-incident fee of $65.

  • Follow up consultations
    Follow up consultations

    Our veterinary toxicology staff will follow up with veterinarians or pet owners to ensure appropriate recommendations can be made throughout the treatment of the pet.

  • Treatment advice for all pets
    Treatment advice for all pets

    Not only do we manage cat poisonings and dog poisonings, we also assist in the treatment of avian, small mammals, large animal and exotic species (on a per-incident fee basis).

Pet Poison Helpline’s parent company, SafetyCall International, LLC, is the world’s largest industry poison control center. SafetyCall provides poison control/adverse event management services for a wide variety of companies in the animal health, ag-chem, human pharmaceutical, dietary supplement, personal care, food, medical device and consumer and institutional product industries. Licensed by the Boards of Medicine, Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, it is the only health care practice operated poison control service to provide professional medical and toxicological advice for humans and animals alike. SafetyCall offers the highest level of care to its clients’ customers by providing expert health, safety and medical information 24/7 to keep them healthy and safe.