Zinc

Zinc

metals

Alternate names

pennies, metallic nuts, coin, bolts, staples, galvanized metal, zippers, toys, zinc oxide, Desitin, diaper rash, diaper rash cream, penny

Toxicity to pets

Zinc poisoning can occur in dogs, cats, and birds secondary to ingesting metal pieces (e.g., nuts, bolts, hardware and other galvanized metals), certain topical ointments (e.g., diaper rash creams), or coins. While some coins can be safely ingested and passed out in the stool a few days later, some types of coins contain large amounts of zinc, resulting in zinc poisoning. When the zinc-containing coin enters the acid environment of the stomach, the zinc breaks down, causing stomach upset and zinc absorption into the blood stream. Zinc poisoning can lead to destruction of red blood cells, liver damage, kidney failure and heart failure. Clinical signs of zinc poisoning include weakness, pale gums (anemia), vomiting, increased breathing, increased heart rate, discolored urine, jaundiced gums, lack of appetite, and collapse. Removal of the coin is important, or severe damage to the red blood cells can occur, resulting in a severe anemia. Without therapy, ingestion of a zinc penny can be fatal.

If you suspect your dog, cat, or bird ingested a metal piece or coin, an x-ray should be done immediately. Call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline immediately for life-saving treatment advice.

Content written by: Dr. Cat Angle, DVM, MPH, Pet Poison Helpline

Coins

Speak to an expert now:

(855) 764-7661

59 incident fee applies

Call now:

(855) 764-7661

    Dogs

    Toxicity Level

    24/7 Call now
    (855) 764-7661

    Cats

    Toxicity Level

    Disclaimer

    The content of this page is not veterinary advice. A number of factors (amount of substance ingested, size of the animal, allergies, etc.) determine what is toxic to a particular pet. If you think your pet has eaten something potentially toxic, call Pet Poison Helpline or seek immediate veterinary treatment.