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Calla Lily

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Poisonous to: Cats, Dogs

Level of toxicity: Generally mild to moderate

Common signs to watch for:

  • Drooling
  • Oral pain
  • Pawing at the mouth
  • Vomiting
  • Inappetance

The calla lily contain insoluble crystals of calcium oxalate that are in bundles called raphites. Chewing or biting into the plant releases the crystals which penetrate tissue resulting in injury. When dogs or cats ingest calla lilies, clinical signs may be seen immediately and include pawing at face (secondary to oral pain), drooling, foaming, and vomiting. Moderate to severe swelling of the lips, tongue, oral cavity, and upper airway may also be seen, making it difficult to breathe or swallow.

The calla lily does NOT result in acute kidney failure when ingested, and is different from more dangerous types of lilies that cause kidney failure (e.g., Easter, day, Asiatic, Japanese show, Tiger lilies).

Poison type: Plants

Alternate names: calcium oxalate crystals, insoluble oxalates, insoluble calcium oxalates

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