Month: February 2011

While we applaud you for composting, make sure to do so appropriately – your compost shouldn’t contain any dairy or meat products, and should always be fenced off for the sake of your pets and wildlife. Source: Backyard compost bins or areas where decaying matter can be found (e.g., forests, etc.). Mechanism of action: These…

Xylitol is a natural sweetener found in small quantities in certain fruit. Xylitol has gained recent popularity due to its sugar-free component, and is often found in diabetic snacks, foods, baked foods, and popular gums and candies. Unfortunately, there are variable amounts of xylitol in each product, and not all sources are disclosed (how many…

During certain times of the year (such as summer and winter), dogs and cats are more exposed to antifreeze. Untreated, antifreeze poisoning can be fatal to pets. Prompt, immediate treatment is necessary in order to save a dog or cat’s life from poisoning. Sources of antifreeze: The primary dangerous source of antifreeze is automotive radiator…

By Liz Greenlee, CVT, EMT and Ahna Brutlag, DVM Did your dog eat rat poison? Pet Poison Helpline gets dozens of calls daily from dog owners (and occasionally cat owners) saying “My dog ate rat poison!” Poisoning from rodenticides (mouse and rat poisons) is one of the most common types of toxicities managed by Pet…

Though they have a bad rap, poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) plants are only mildly toxic to cats and dogs. Sources: During the holidays, Poinsettias are a popular Christmas plant. Mechanism of action: The milky white sap found in poinsettias contains chemicals called diterpenoid euphorbol esters and saponin-like detergents. While poinsettias are commonly “hyped” as poisonous plants,…